University of Pittsburgh-Pittsburgh Campus Graduate Program Reviews

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96%
of students recommend
(4.24 out of 5.0)
School rating based on 23 respondents

School Highlights

Most
Affordable
Regionally
Accredited
Non
Profit
High
Grad. Rate
Has Online
Degrees
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School Ratings

Campus Safety
Career Advising
Quality of Instruction
Student Diversity
Networking Opportunities
Student Financial Services
Satisfaction With Degree
Earning Potential
Prepared for Career
Rigor of Curriculum

School Information

  • Website: Visit College Website
  • School Accreditation: MSCHE, + 3 more
  • Programmatic Accreditation: ABA, + 13 more
  • Campus Setting: City: Large
  • Student Population: 28,649 (18,615 undergrad)
  • Student to Faculty Ratio: 14 to 1
  • Graduate Attendance Status: 24% part-time, 76% full-time
  • Annual Tuition: $20,704 in-state; $33,426 out-of-state
Source: NCES

Student & Graduate Reviews

5.0 out of 5.0
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Degree: Nursing
Graduation Year: 2020

Since the very beginning, the faculty has made the effort to get to know me and my story. They customize a plan of action for your education and meet with you frequently along the way. The CRNA program is ranked number four in the country and it is easy to see why. Education is coming from some of the most respected CRNA's in the field, providing first-hand knowledge and experience to teach. Their minimum requirements to graduate one of the highest; 99% of their student have more the double the requirement to sit for the national boards.
4.64 out of 5.0
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Degree: Nursing
Graduation Year: 2017

Challenging but fulfilling program. Support is definitely available but you have to be willing to seek it out if interested. Overall, its a wonderful program- slightly expensive but worth the commitment.
4.18 out of 5.0
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Degree: Nursing
Graduation Year: 2015

The program is very researched focus which is a benefit. However, if you are not under a T32, you are not treated as a valuable student. You are used in other areas that are not research intensive, such as teaching or grad assistance. I love teaching so this was not an issue but my academic career lacked in opportunities for research. This is a problem especially as a PhD student. But if a student is solely researched focus, there is a huge issue in teaching opportunities. The program needs to have students become experienced in both teaching & research.
4.61 out of 5.0
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Degree: Nursing
Graduation Year: 2015

The graduate programs at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing are demanding in terms of workload and critical thinking, but worth it in terms of the exposure, experiences, and collaborations you build. Definitely worth the value!
4.07 out of 5.0
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Degree: Nursing
Graduation Year: 2017

The Pitt program is challenging and intense, but you'll get all the support you need from faculty, staff, and fellow grad students. Living in pittsburgh is wonderful(minus the winter)- there's plenty to do, the cost of living is reasonable, and housing options are plentiful and comfortable.
4.29 out of 5.0
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Degree: Nursing
Graduation Year: 2015

A rich learning environment with expert faculty. The students are supportive but there is a healthy level of competition.
3.82 out of 5.0
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Degree: Nursing
Graduation Year: 2017

The clinical experiences/rotations are limited by the University excluding the second largest hospital system in the area due to political tensions between the university's medical system insurance company and the other hospital system. The school collaborates with their own medical system and none other which limits the diversity and quality of clinicals.
1.93 out of 5.0
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Degree: Nursing
Graduation Year: 2015

As a minority nurse, my experience at Pitt has been quite different than my white counterparts. Though I would agree that my overall education at Pitt has been good, I would also share that learning experiences are always what you make them. One can always develop perseverance, wisdom, strength, and grace in a trying experience. It is my observation that Pitt has a long way to go with regards to diversity, cultural competency and sensitivity. I am the only African American in my program and 9/10 times in my classroom. I find myself often distracted and discouraged by the lack of minorities portrayed positively in class presentations, lecture slides. and learning materials, and hurt by the inappropriate and insensitive comments instructors make about patients or communities they serve. Intentionally or unintentionally, instructors/ authority figures promote and reinforce stereotypes and bias to open-minded, developing students. It's very frustrating and saddening. There are systems/rules/practices in place that are really not supportive, open, or conducive to students of different cultures, backgrounds, upbringing, and perspectives. Though I understand the need to standardize or make black and white the education provided, I often feel restricted and as though there is a reluctance or resistance to open-mindedness or recognition of the gray. When it comes to my concerns as a minority student, I do not feel like I am heard or acknowledged, and I do not feel like my difference is appreciated. I believe that by attempting to ignore the fact that I am different, that Pitt erroneously thinks that they are being supportive and accepting of differences. However, being a minority student here has not been a great struggle, it has elucidated the grave conservatism and reactionary mindset of this great institution. Though Pitt’s prestige and networking is excellent, I would NOT recommend this institution to a loved one. For me, my program’s lack of support, diversity, open-mindedness, and acknowledgement or interest to change it’s very antiquate ways was not conducive to true growth. To survive, I have found myself needing to keep my head down and mouth shut about injustices because there is no true forum to address these concerns. To attempt to do so, you’ll be thrown underneath a bus, figuratively. That has been my experience. I, unfortunately, continue to witness prejudice, bias, and cultural incompetence and Insensitivity. There is no liaison, student advocate, or forum/space to address or discuss these taboo issues. There are a few minority faculty members who will provide a wonderful moral support for minority students. However, it is my understanding and observation that these issues of prejudice and cultural insensitivity permeates faculty to faculty relationships, not just faculty to student relationships. My advice for other minority students is to simply take heed. You will face many unnecessary challenges and struggle at this predominantly white institution, due to a lack of diversity in faculty, students, and thinking. These issues are not solely ingrained in some faculty, but they are condoned and supported by an overall restrictive and conservative institution.
3.82 out of 5.0
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Degree: Nursing
Graduation Year: 2015

My grad program was challenging and prepared me well.
4.43 out of 5.0
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Degree: Nursing
Graduation Year: 2015

Pros: PhD students are well supported throughout the program both by faculty and through student mentorship. Courses are taught by seasoned faculty with many years of experience in the area of the course. An excellent education for most students. Cons: Some students who have areas of interest that don't mesh with faculty will have a harder time finding help and support.
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