Graduateprograms.com Announces Best Law Schools for Academic Competitiveness, Social Life and Workload

Graduateprograms.com, the online guide to graduate schools, recently released the “Top 25 Student Rated Law Schools in the U.S.” followed by their release of “Best Law Schools for Financial Aid”. Graduateprograms.com is now releasing the best law schools based solely on student reviews of the following characteristics:

Academic Competitiveness- Is the level of peer competition healthy, is it cut-throat or is it somewhere in between?
Social Life- Is it easy for law students to meet people and make friends and/or date.
Manageable Workload- Is the workload generally manageable? Is law school work pertinent, practical, and constructive or just busy work?

The rankings are based solely on surveys completed by graduate students and use a 10 star system (with 1 being the lowest and 10 being the best) and verbatim answers submitted by 4,000 students (including those currently enrolled and recent grads) from over 150 accredited law schools across the United States.

The following law schools were ranked highest for Academic Competitiveness:

1. Vanderbilt University
2. Stanford University
3. University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
4. Baylor University
5. Cornell University

Top five for Social Life:

1. Washington University in St. Louis
2. University of California-Berkeley
3. The University of Texas at Austin
4. University of Colorado at Boulder
5. Stanford University

Top five for Manageable Workloads:

1. Baylor University
2. University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
3. Cornell University
4. University of Miami
5. Columbia University

One Class of 2014 law student said this of Vanderbilt: “Vanderbilt Law can be classified as collegial overall. It fosters a very comfortable yet sufficiently challenging learning environment. It is definitely not one of the “cut-throat” law schools.”

One Class of 2012 law student said this of Berkeley: “Boalt still manages to offer a collegial and supportive work environment among classmates. Prior to law school, I had heard horror stories about students tearing out the pages of library casebooks and materials, so the other students would not have access to them. Therefore, I freaked out when I was out sick for a week within my first month of law school. I was shocked and pleasantly surprised when people I barely knew or did not know at all were offering me their notes when I returned.”