Augusta University Graduate Program Reviews

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100%
of students recommend
(4.2 out of 5.0)
School rating based on 15 respondents

School Highlights

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School Ratings

Quality of Instruction
Student Financial Services
Satisfaction With Degree
Earning Potential
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School Information

  • Website: Visit College Website
  • School Accreditation: SACS COC, + 2 more
  • Campus Setting: City: Midsize
  • Student Population: 7,938 (5,133 undergrad)
  • Student to Faculty Ratio: 14 to 1
  • Graduate Attendance Status: 16% part-time, 84% full-time
  • Annual Tuition: $6,834 in-state; $19,234 out-of-state
Source: NCES

Student & Graduate Reviews

4.2 out of 5.0
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Degree: Nursing
Graduation Year: 2018

I have just finished my first semester in Augusta University's Clinical Nurse Leader program. This is a four-semester, accelerated program, and everything is VERY fast-paced. We hit the ground running, and I am still in shock that we are already done with our first semester! Here is what I think about the program so far: The good-- * I think the absolute most positive aspect of this program is that our instructors genuinely care about each student. They are kind and truly want all of us to succeed. I have heard that many nursing schools try to weed out students that may struggle, but the instructors in my CNL program are focused on doing whatever it takes so that our entire cohort will make it to graduation. * This program has a rather large cohort spread out over two campuses, which provides options for prospective students. Additionally, the Augusta location has partnered with several hospitals in the area for clinical and practicum experiences, so students have the opportunity for unique and diverse learning. * Comparatively, this program is roughly the same price as a BSN program would be. While I think that the cost is on the cheaper side, I do still feel that it is expensive (but I am of the mind that college should be free!). * We have been told that RNs who have their CNL certification are given a $0.50-$1.00/hour raise, which I personally think is VERY appealing, even if you have no intention of actually practicing as a CNL! The bad-- * I have found that I have had to teach myself most of the material we are given, but that is mostly because of my learning style, and I do not place any of the blame on my faculty for that. *We have several team-based learning-style classes over the course of this program. Many students did not enjoy the two TBL classes that we had this semester. Our student representative on the Program Committee alerted the faculty to this, but they have invested heavily into training for TBL courses, so it is something that may not change for future cohorts. Personally, I feel that most of the issues with TBL are traced back to the fact that many students have not yet learned how to work on a team. We were allowed to give feedback at the end of the semesters, so we gave suggestions on how to make TBL courses easier moving forward. * Finally, the accelerated nature of the program presents with the expected challenges. Moving so quickly, while definitely a positive (because it saves money and time, and allows you to enter the workforce more quickly) is VERY challenging. It felt like I never had time to breathe. That being said, I have additional obligations because I was elected to serve as class President, and I also volunteer with a new organization called the Student-Patient Allies. If you are considering applying to this program, here are a few tips to make the transition into the program easier: * I would HIGHLY recommend that you learn how to work on a team. If nothing else, take a personality quiz to determine what kind of a teammate you are. If you know this, and can verbalize it when you're assigned to your first TBL classes, it will probably save you a great deal of stress. * If you're like me, and learn best using multiple forms of information, I would consider finding additional resources, whatever you need. Personally, I got a subscription to an online service called NRSNG Academy. I did not purchase this subscription until after my first exams, so I got to see first-hand how much it helped for me to do things my way, instead of just listening to the lectures and reading the PowerPoints. Episodes of Crash Course on YouTube and Nursing videos on Khan Academy were also very helpful for me. * Be prepared to pay close to $400-1,000 extra per semester for books and online software, depending on if you want to buy new books or not. Personally, I rent my books, or buy the previous edition if I can find it for a good price. I have found several of our textbooks at a local Goodwill. We are also required to buy several online subscriptions that vary in price, but ended up costing around $300-400 for this semester alone. I know this was a long review, but deciding to go to grad school is a big life choice. I hope this helped you make your decision! :)
4.0 out of 5.0
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Degree: Nursing
Graduation Year: 2016

I felt that I received a great education from the nursing program at Augusta University. The professors are so knowledgeable and encouraging.
4.33 out of 5.0
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Degree: Nursing
Graduation Year: 2017

The highlights of this school as a whole include the location and climate (especially when placed in comparison to Minneapolis, MN), as well as the size of the institution; in a similar fashion to Goldy Locks, Augusta University it is not too big, or too small - I chose it because it is just the right size for me. Although, the prevailing reason that I chose this particular program has to do with it's quality. The Master of Science in Nursing with a Concentration in Clinical Nurse Leader lasts sixteen months, it demonstrates that it prepares it's cohort for the NCLEX exam through a high passing rate, and the professors consistently are invested in their students - an assertion that is reflected in the program's low drop-out/withdrawal rate. The drawbacks for this program surround it's inherent intensity and the pacing of the material, but I knew this would be the nature of my studies when I accepted my offer for enrollment.
4.5 out of 5.0
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Degree: Nursing
Graduation Year: 2017

I am in the nursing anesthesia program at GRU. Pros: -The faculty sincerely cares about their students. They devote numerous hours of their personal time for extra study reviews or lab hours to ensure we comprehensively know our material. -The workload is rigorous but that is expected of the only CRNA program in the state. I believe I will be well prepared for my boards when I graduate, as well as feel confident stepping into the OR solo for the first time. Cons: -There is no true campus housing. -The area surrounding the downtown medical campus and hospital is not the safest or cleanest. -PARKING IS EXTREMELY TERRIBLE. TERRIBLE.
4.0 out of 5.0
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Degree: Nursing
Graduation Year: 2017

Pros: Hi level of support for individualized research; there doesn't need to be a direct research match for admission. Cons: Students need to be proactive in seeking out additional educational/networking opportunities.
4.58 out of 5.0
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Degree: Nursing
Graduation Year: 2016

I am a part of the Clinical Nurse Leader program. The staff is very supportive. The program is phenomenal. Although it is an accelerated program, the staff works with you to ensure that you are actually grasping the skills needed to succeed in the field. The clinical professors also are very helpful and the hospital experience makes everything come together.
4.75 out of 5.0
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Degree: Nursing
Graduation Year: 2016

Extremely well respected school in the medical field! The university will introduce you to a wonderful network of people who will provide you great support throughout your education and career!
4.25 out of 5.0
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Degree: Nursing
Graduation Year: 2017

GRU is one of the frontrunners when it comes to health care and they display that in the education they provide. Graduate school is good value, but for an out of state student, is expensive.
4.0 out of 5.0
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Degree: Nursing
Graduation Year: 2016

The Georgia Regents University graduate program for Nurse Anesthesia is demanding mentally, physically, and financially. By being the only nurse anesthesia program in the state of Georgia, Georgia Regents University must be able to provide an environment condusive for graduation to occur. I feel that the faculty perfectly balances rigorous course work with tools to succeed. Although this program will be the hardest educational experience for me to date I am confident Georgia Regents University will prepare me for my career ahead.
2.42 out of 5.0
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Degree: Nursing
Graduation Year: 2014

Cons- Since the merger of Augusta State and MCG, the process of registering and making sure that things are in order is extremely difficult. Hopefully when things are in order, it will run smoothly. Pros- This institution is very prestigious among medical doctors and nursing students. I am proud to know that I will ensure proper and efficient education to take care of future patients.
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