Columbia University in the City of New York Graduate Program Reviews

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94%
of students recommend
(3.84 out of 5.0)
School rating based on 578 respondents

School Highlights

Most
Affordable
Regionally
Accredited
Non
Profit
High
Grad. Rate
Has Online
Degrees
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School Ratings

Quality of Instruction
Student Financial Services
Satisfaction With Degree
Earning Potential
Prepared for Career

School Information

  • Website: Visit College Website
  • School Accreditation: MSCHE, + 2 more
  • Programmatic Accreditation: AACSB, + 11 more
  • Campus Setting: City: Large
  • Student Population: 28,086 (8,102 undergrad)
  • Student to Faculty Ratio: 6 to 1
  • Graduate Attendance Status: 20% part-time, 80% full-time
  • Annual Tuition: $44,176
Source: NCES

Student & Graduate Reviews

3.67 out of 5.0
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Degree: Journalism
Graduation Year: 2015

I have been incredibly content with my choice to attend grad school at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. I attend part time and I feel as though I have been pushed to work at a higher level, which is one of the major reasons I wanted to attend grad school. There are incredible lectures as well as notable guest lectures as well. I wanted to take a step back and examine what is next for the field, as well as build a more solidified foundation. I feel as if I am doing both at The Journalism School.
3.08 out of 5.0
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Degree: Journalism
Graduation Year: 2015

Amazing place to really immerse oneself in journalism. Program is only one year which is very nice, but it is quite an investment. So make sure this is really something you want to pursue before committing.
4.25 out of 5.0
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Degree: Social Work
Graduation Year: 2016

Although, I have just started my program I feel that it is teaching me a lot. I have recently begun my field placement and already I am getting a lot of direct practice experience. The largest con of going to Columbia for graduate school would be the price and the small amounts of scholarship money they provide students (needs based) within their first year.
3.67 out of 5.0
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Degree: Mathematics
Graduation Year: 2015

Teachers are great, at least many of them. State-of-the-art program includes many hot topics such as Data Mining and Machine Learning. The program is very popular among international students, particularly from China. Campus is great, NYC is fabulous.
4.5 out of 5.0
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Degree: Liberal Arts
Graduation Year: 2015

A highly competitive course, designed for experienced journalists, this program equips the students to competently act as experts on their chosen ares of concentration. One of the best of its kind, it is highly regarded for its rich quality of education and level of competition. However, I feel that it's squeezed too tight within a framework of nine months, which precludes the students from complete immersion in the course, due to the time constraints.
4.58 out of 5.0
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Degree: Journalism
Graduation Year: 2015

Pros: Strong curriculum Great social life Accessible faculty and staff Pleasant campus life Strong alumni network Conveniently located in New York City Cons: Expensive living and housing Student involvement from other programs
2.17 out of 5.0
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Degree: Journalism
Graduation Year: 2016

Very prestigious school with a wealth of opportunity. However, the campus is open 24 hours anyone can walk in at anytime. I don't always feel safe leaving campus at night after classes.
3.42 out of 5.0
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Degree: Journalism
Graduation Year: 2015

Columbia Journalism School provides its students access to an incredible network. The faculty does an excellent job organizing lectures from guests whose work is completely relevant to both the times and what we are studying. For instance, in the wake of ISIS beheadings and questions surrounding the safety of freelance journalists, Columbia invited guest lecturers who personally knew Foley or who had worked with him as well as reporters who have been in Foley's situation (but got out alive, obviously). Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism does not sugar coat the dangers surrounding investigative journalism nor does it discourage us from pursuing our aspirations as journalists. The faculty has a great way of telling it like it is while deeply inspiring us. The cons of our program, however, are no different than those that other universities are facing: shortage in financial aid. I am a first-generation college student from a lower-middle class family. My mother works three jobs— as a caregiver for a woman with cerebral palsy, a teacher's aide for down syndrome and autistic students, and as the caregiver for an elderly woman— and my dad, a U.S. Navy veteran, has a government job as a letter carrier for the U.S. Postal Service. They make ends meet and sign off on "parent loans," that in actuality, they will not be able to pay for. I shook hands with my dad and made a promise that I will cover the cost of the parents loans following my graduation. I have no choice but to hope that I will land a career in which I'll have the finances to fulfill that promise. In a perfect world, my education would be paid for entirely by grants and scholarships, but that is not how the cookie crumbled for me. Nevertheless, I am incredibly grateful for having been chosen to attend Columbia University, my dream school, and couldn't have imagine ever turning down the opportunity.
4.83 out of 5.0
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Degree: Journalism
Graduation Year: 2015

The journalism program is fantastic. At its core is tutelage in reporting, and in terms of practical application New York City is our playground. Class assignments take us all over the city, often to areas none of us would ever have visited. The school teaches journalism in all its various forms, styles, and disciplines and all the faculty are highly experienced journalists. As well as this, the program offers classes in business, law, ethics, and history. The program will certainly leave me academically ready, as well as opening up vast employment opportunities.
4.75 out of 5.0
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Degree: Journalism
Graduation Year: 2015

Pros: In-depth learning on one specific field of journalism. Working journalists from all across the globe gather to share their views and learn how to not only cover different beats, different subject matter but to take it a step further and produce an analysis piece. Cons: Work load is too intense as the program is squeezed into a nine months period.
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