Columbia University in the City of New York Graduate Program Reviews

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94%
of students recommend
(3.84 out of 5.0)
School rating based on 578 respondents

School Highlights

Most
Affordable
Regionally
Accredited
Non
Profit
High
Grad. Rate
Has Online
Degrees
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School Ratings

Quality of Instruction
Student Financial Services
Satisfaction With Degree
Earning Potential
Prepared for Career

School Information

  • Website: Visit College Website
  • School Accreditation: MSCHE, + 2 more
  • Programmatic Accreditation: AACSB, + 11 more
  • Campus Setting: City: Large
  • Student Population: 28,086 (8,102 undergrad)
  • Student to Faculty Ratio: 6 to 1
  • Graduate Attendance Status: 20% part-time, 80% full-time
  • Annual Tuition: $44,176
Source: NCES

Student & Graduate Reviews

3.83 out of 5.0
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Degree: Health Sciences
Graduation Year: 2014

The Master's of Bioethics program at Columbia University is unique in that it provides opportunities to learn both inside and outside the classroom. The other students come from a myriad of different backgrounds which really enriches the class discussions. The faculty is both helpful and encouraging, but they also strive to challenge us to think critically. In addition, there are so many opportunities to expand your mind in New York City! The location is ideal, but also safe. I highly recommend this program to anyone interested in the growing field of bioethics.
4.83 out of 5.0
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Degree: Physical Therapy
Graduation Year: 2015

The challenges of Columbia are as follows: Manhattan, even Washington Heights, can be a very expensive place to live in or near. Also, the amount of information each student is expected to learn is substantial in complexity, volume, and detail. Finally, the tuition for all three years is nearly half the cost of a humble condominium in this area (Tuition ~$100K). The benefits far outweigh the difficulties, though. The dedication of the teaching staff has, on the whole, been not only helpful, but humbling; some have made themselves available on weekends and have held twice-weekly meetings to review notes with students who have had extreme difficulty. The student body is also amazingly encouraging and supportive: There's far more support than competition, and the second- and third-year students make themselves very available to answer our questions or concerns. Finally, the though the workload can be challenging, it is appropriate to our career responsibilities, and I am confident we will be very well prepared upon graduation.
3.5 out of 5.0
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Degree: Law
Graduation Year: 2014

Fantastic career opportunities. And I actually really like the location in Morningside Heights. Its homey and more calm than downtown.
4.5 out of 5.0
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Degree: Law
Graduation Year: 2014

It is a very prestigious and competitive program, but I do not like the number of transfer students who were admitted this academic year.
4.17 out of 5.0
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Degree: Liberal Arts
Graduation Year: 2015

There's probably no better program in the field in terms of instructor quality, prestige, alumni network, and local and international resources. Most faculty are highly accessible and supportive, with a few unfortunate outliers. (I speak as a PhD student, not an MA. MA students get less access and less respect. I think this is true at most every really ambitious research program, but I know it's true here.) The students are friendly and engaged and have a lot of fun together, but the workload is intense and the cost of living on a meager student stipend will get you down. Not at first, but as the years pile up.... This is a long program and believe me, you won't finish with the endurance and good spirits you started with. Unless, of course, you have some independent source of wealth, like a lover or parents. Then you'll focus on nothing but studies and find this all very rewarding. All of this is a way of saying.... If you insist on getting a PhD in this field, this is the place to do it. But unless you don't have to worry about paying your bills, now or ever, don't do it. It's not just about how broke you'll be for the 5-10 years you'll spend completing the degree. It's about the deficit of jobs in academia, and the fact that this degree qualifies you for nothing else. Educate yourself about the career, not just the degree, before you sign up. Read the Chronicle of Higher Ed and every other source you can find on the academic job market, especially adjuncting. Take seriously the way your entire life is put on hold while you struggle to get this degree, and then to get a stable job in a field where no one is hiring. Take seriously the possibility that your priorities might change, 10 years into this process, and you won't have set yourself up with many options for changing the way you're living. And above all, DO NOT go into debt to get this degree. Do not. It's not an investment; it's just debt. If the institution doesn't respect you enough to pay your way, you don't need to be there. An advanced degree in the humanities is a luxury good. (I.e., if you can't afford it, you shouldn't have it.) Idealism doesn't put food on your table. If you're hungry for knowledge and can't afford the degree, get a job and a library card and work both as hard as you can. You'll be way better off in the long run.
3.25 out of 5.0
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Degree: Architecture
Graduation Year: 2015

Great access to cutting edge discourses of the discipline. Competitive studio atmosphere. High cost of living and tutition.
4.0 out of 5.0
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Degree: Anthropology
Graduation Year: 2014

Columbia is in New York City, so that answers social life, affordability of living, campus safety, etc. So it comes down to the anthropology program, which has some of the best minds in the country. They are accessible, they will push you, and they will work to be on the cutting edge. At times the stress of being in an Ivy League will interfere, on both your part and theirs. But overall, if you want to come out feeling like you are an expert ready to compete, this is your place.
4.5 out of 5.0
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Degree: Social Work
Graduation Year: 2014

Social Work School in Columbia University is the oldest social work school in U.S. Overall, The school and the program have very high quality, but meantime it brings a lot of pressure because it's very competitive. Field Placement is an important part in the program curriculum. It is required to do field education for 3 days a week, and spend 2 days per week at school for academic classes.
5.0 out of 5.0
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Degree: Fine Arts
Graduation Year: 2013

I am a current graduate MFA Creative Film Producing student at Columbia University, which continues to be truly the best experience I have ever had in my life. The value that this education offers is incredible, for of course it is ivy league, but it goes beyond that. The quality of the curriculum and professors is exactly what I was looking for in a graduate school, the incredible Columbia name to support me through my career search, as well as the fellow students in my program make my school the perfect place for me. I'd say the cons of my graduate Creative Producing film program is that it is a newer program. The Screenwriting/Directing film program at Columbia is much more established (Katheryn Bigelow, director of "Zero Dark Thirty" & Academy Award Best Picture winner "The Hurt Locker" is an alum). Since my Producing program is a lot newer, there are still issues that need to be smoothed out, such as kinds of classes that are offered. Overall, I HIGHLY recommend Columbia University for a graduate degree in Creative Film Producing, Screenwriting or Directing!
4.83 out of 5.0
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Degree: MBA
Graduation Year: 2015

I love columbia university. It is a special place.
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