CUNY Graduate School and University Center Graduate Program Reviews

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85%
of students recommend
(3.93 out of 5.0)
School rating based on 55 respondents

School Highlights

Most
Affordable
Regionally
Accredited
Non
Profit
High
Grad. Rate
Has Online
Degrees
Find an Online Degree:

School Ratings

Quality of Instruction
Student Financial Services
Satisfaction With Degree
Earning Potential
Prepared for Career

School Information

  • Website: Visit College Website
  • School Accreditation: MSCHE
  • Programmatic Accreditation: APA, + 2 more
  • Campus Setting: City: Large
  • Student Population: 6,954 (1,795 undergrad)
  • Student to Faculty Ratio: 8 to 1
  • Graduate Attendance Status: 26% part-time, 74% full-time
  • Annual Tuition: $9,373 in-state; $21,313 out-of-state
Source: NCES

Student & Graduate Reviews

4.08 out of 5.0
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Degree: Journalism
Graduation Year: 2014

The CUNY SChool of Journalism is great because it is a small program that really is focused on making sure students are better journalists. Not only are the professors there to give whatever help they can, but so are is the Dean. They are very proud of work that their students produce and make a point to showcase that. It's very affordable and right down the street from the New York Times that really help students put their work into perspective from time to time.
4.08 out of 5.0
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Degree: Social Sciences
Graduation Year: 2013

The program is geared towards working as well as working people. But I also feel that it is a program for those who are already employed and have experience in the field.
1.5 out of 5.0
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Degree: Sociology
Graduation Year: 2015

It's expensive - it's in Manhattan!
4.5 out of 5.0
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Degree: Journalism
Graduation Year: 2014

What I like about CUNY School of Journalism is that is for people who want to learn more the craft of journalism and all that it encompasses. I like that it's an accessible school for anyone and is not intimidating. You feel comfortable right away through the application process with current students and the admissions committee helping you along the way. The opportunities that school offers is also great. As a journalist is can hard to find steady work and they are there to help us transition into bonafide journalists.
3.5 out of 5.0
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Degree: Social Sciences
Graduation Year: 2015

The professors are top notch researchers, but many are terrible teachers, pedagogically speaking. While the faculty are generally available outside of class, there is next to little support or encouragement from them to do any real professional development until fairly late in your degree plan. For example, I'm a 6th year student in the program and have only recently (this semester) been encouraged to submit my work for a conference presentation. Compare this to my masters program where they were encouraging and expecting me to submit conference abstracts in my first year. In my current program, when I have suggested that I submit my work for publication or conference presentations (other than grad student conferences), the reactions I get from faculty are luke warm at best. The departmental and institutional financial support is practically non-existant. Even if you are lucky enough to receive a fellowship, you have to work many hours a week to fullfill the terms of the agreement. The school offers a tuition remission if you adjunct at another school in-system, but not only is the pay abominable (forcing you to find a second job to make ends meet), but you only get 10 semesters of tuition remission. Plus, the remission only covers in-state costs, making the financial burden of living and going to school here even greater for out-of-state students. Campus life is minimal and the sense of community between students in my program does not exist. You will likely make friends with people you take classes with, but it is difficult to know or meet other students in the program. This is mainly because ALL of the students in the program have to have full-time or multiple part-time jobs in order to afford the high cost of living in NYC. This factor also makes it difficult for students to attend the colloquia that the department hosts. This is a great program where you will grow and learn academically and personally, but it is best suited for self-starters and people who go/make their own way. It would also be ideal for someone who is independently wealthy. Some of the major pros are: the student services offered by the Graduate Center; lots of free cultural and arts activities available in GC and NYC; adequate computer labs and printing abilities; lots of chances to meet and work with top names in the field.
4.25 out of 5.0
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Degree: Philosophy
Graduation Year: 2016

Little funding and a lot of teaching, but very good faculty and great connections.
4.25 out of 5.0
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Degree: Journalism
Graduation Year: 2013

Inexpensive compared to other journalism schools in New York; great faculty
4.33 out of 5.0
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Degree: Liberal Arts
Graduation Year: 2013

I enjoy my Labor Studies program very much but I wish there were more classes offered online on over the weekend. I am a commuter student so it is difficult to make time in the evening to go to class.
5.0 out of 5.0
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Degree: Business
Graduation Year: 2015

This school offers online courses and is prefect for professional students with families and other obligations, looking to further their education and increase their competitive reach. This increases the diversity of the student body. The faculty is always wiling and able to help. The workload is intense, but it compensates for not being in a classroom setting. The assignments add depth tot he courses and enables the student to fully digest and own the information.
3.5 out of 5.0
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Degree: Liberal Arts
Graduation Year: 2015

The professors are wonderful, they apply the pedagogy they teach. The material is pertinent and exciting. No scholarships available as it's a fairly new program.
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