Indiana University - Bloomington Graduate Program Reviews

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95%
of students recommend
(4.06 out of 5.0)
School rating based on 231 respondents

School Highlights

Most
Affordable
Regionally
Accredited
Non
Profit
High
Grad. Rate
Has Online
Degrees
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School Ratings

Quality of Instruction
Student Financial Services
Satisfaction With Degree
Earning Potential
Prepared for Career

School Information

  • Website: Visit College Website
  • School Accreditation: NCA HLC, + 3 more
  • Programmatic Accreditation: AACSB, + 10 more
  • Campus Setting: City: Small
  • Student Population: 48,514 (38,364 undergrad)
  • Student to Faculty Ratio: 17 to 1
  • Graduate Attendance Status: 38% part-time, 62% full-time
  • Annual Tuition: $9,743 in-state; $28,113 out-of-state
Source: NCES

Student & Graduate Reviews

4.08 out of 5.0
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Degree: Criminal Justice
Graduation Year: 2015

I love my program and am glad that I pursued my PhD at IU, but feel unsupported by faculty/dissertation committee in the dissertation process.
4.17 out of 5.0
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Degree: Computer Science
Graduation Year: 2015

One of the Best schools for Research since there are a lot of opportunities for collaboration between different departments.
3.25 out of 5.0
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Degree: Information Technology
Graduation Year: 2014

A good balance of technology and management courses that can be tailored to your needs based on your career path. Professors are really helpful and always respond to your emails pretty fast.
5.0 out of 5.0
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Degree: Biology
Graduation Year: 2018

IUB has a great graduate program in EEB. The faculty members are known world-wide. Bloomington is wonderful as well - great food, entertainment, and friendly.
4.83 out of 5.0
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Degree: Sociology
Graduation Year: 2018

IU is simply one of the best programs in the country. While higher ranked programs rely on their ability to recruit the top students, IU takes a variety of students and turns them into the top scholars. Faculty approach students to work on projects and funding isn't competitive, so collaboration is common. The department is generalist, so you can really keep an open mind about your interests and methodologically, you will become proficient in both qualitative and quantitative methods. Brilliant program. If you can get in here, go here!
0.92 out of 5.0
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Degree: Public Administration
Graduation Year: 2016

This program is academically and intellectually bankrupt. Too much emphasis is placed on the bottom line, the physical degree, rather than the education.
3.0 out of 5.0
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Degree: Biomedical Sciences
Graduation Year: 2015

Pros: The program has gotten better over the years I have been here... Specific requirements have been better defined, students have better understanding of those requirements, and organization of and consistency in expectations during early years through quals (better, not great, but willingness to change is a good thing). More effort is being put in by program directors (faculty members), to make those changes instead of the traditional "yes, let's do this" but no action. Great medical insurance, including dental and vision coverage! Excellent student resources -all aspects of health care, gym/fitness/rec facilities, random experiences to try (pottery? scuba? nationally-renowned student opera/orchestra/band? great entertainment brought in like Mama Mia, the Dalai Lama). Plenty of university and community service opportunities. AMAZING cost of living, and a great Midwest town to live in if you grew up on the west coast. Cons: Regularly feel that there are greater expectations for me since I do not have a significant other or children. Hard to get help with any difficulties with advisor. Stigma attached to because specific experiences have led me to changing pursuit to something other than a PhD-related career, yet I want to finish my degree. I have legit reason to be concerned that the recommendation letters I will need will minimize more factual ability and contributions in favor of picking-and-choosing pieces of evidence that support uneducated and unwavering opinions. The sciences are supposed to be founded in making conclusions from the entire set of data, not picking and choosing the points that support your idea. Contradicting information: "have a life and take care of yourself," but in the same conversation, "do not have any extracurricular activities (sports, community service, and to some extent university service). Biased in favor of accepting anything "The Old Boys" want: if the PI wants his/her student to graduate and when, whether or not the PI thinks their students should pass qualifying exams, etc. Overall: Make sure you know what questions to ask that cover all your bases and all your life desires for the next five-seven years, because wanting to pursue something else means that you cannot handle difficult things, so whatever you want to pursue better not be considered difficult. Ask about the CURRENT state of department and faculty funding, RECENT student grant acceptance track record, availability and competition for college/university-wide funding, and the likelihood you will be able to be able to receive funding if your project does not work and you end up in school longer than you expect. IUB is a great community, the department needs to continue to move in a positive direction, which it does seem to be doing.
4.17 out of 5.0
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Degree: Library Science
Graduation Year: 2015

The pros of my graduate program is that in my field of Library Science there are a huge amount of people who are able to get student jobs training us for our future careers. Since the program is small there is also the opportunity to receive one on one time with professors. We also have a great group for networking opportunities. The only con is that we do not have a huge amount of resources for financial aid but the cost of living in Bloomington is low so it is possible to enjoy your time here without feeling like you have to spend a huge amount of money for fun.
4.33 out of 5.0
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Degree: Liberal Studies
Graduation Year: 2016

The program has been wonderful so far and I have learnt a lot this semester. The curriculum is well thought out and tailored to the needs of the students. I wish there were more electives though, so that students could pick more courses of their choice.
2.83 out of 5.0
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Degree: Liberal Studies
Graduation Year: 2016

The Human-Computer Interaction/design course is well-structured and teaches us a lot of important things, not just in the academic sense but in life as well. It inculcates a sense of belonging and the professors are extremely inclusive. I feel there are not enough available positions for International students to working as a Graduate Assistant / Research Assistant. An increase in the number of these positions would definitely help international students to afford their education at the same time provide valuable contribution to the university.
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