New York University Graduate Program Reviews

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97%
of students recommend
(3.97 out of 5.0)
School rating based on 563 respondents

School Highlights

Most
Affordable
Regionally
Accredited
Non
Profit
High
Grad. Rate
Has Online
Degrees
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School Ratings

Quality of Instruction
Student Financial Services
Satisfaction With Degree
Earning Potential
Prepared for Career

School Information

  • Website: Visit College Website
  • School Accreditation: MSCHE, + 3 more
  • Campus Setting: City: Large
  • Student Population: 50,550 (26,135 undergrad)
  • Student to Faculty Ratio: 10 to 1
  • Graduate Attendance Status: 32% part-time, 68% full-time
  • Annual Tuition: $43,848
Source: NCES

Student & Graduate Reviews

4.0 out of 5.0
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Degree: Information Technology
Graduation Year: 2010

Beautiful place, good teachers... And you get a degree from the better.
3.2 out of 5.0
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Degree: MBA
Graduation Year: 2007

College is expensive. I'm glad I went, but I am absolutely not using my degree. Start a side gig and don't work for the man
5.0 out of 5.0
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Degree: Occupational Therapy
Graduation Year: 2019

Attending New York University's Occupational Therapy program was one of the best decisions of my life. The resources NYU provides are endless. The staff is absolutely incredible. Starting from the security guards who are always there to great you with a smile, wish you, luck on your exams or just telling you to have a good day. I could go on and on about the professional staff. I have had the most amazing professors. They don't treat you like students, they treat you as future professionals, as their equal. They truly want to shape you to be the best therapist that you can possibly be. Each of our professors is passionate and amazingly educated within their specialty. On to the student body! My classmates have truly become my best friends. It is the most supportive program I have ever been in. You never have to worry about feeling alone or not having someone to lean on, no matter what someone is there. Outside of the classroom NYU provides ample opportunities to further your education and network. I have had the opportunity to participate in a workshop where I learned how to use improv to help those on the autism spectrum and sat in on a lecture about a new treatment for ADHD. I have had the opportunity to network with individuals outside of my professions through NYU's Rehab collective and NYU IPEG. Over all I can do nothing but praise this program. If you are passionate, want to learn and willing to work it is the best place for you.
4.0 out of 5.0
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Degree: Exercise Science
Graduation Year: 2017

I enjoyed my graduate experience at New York University very much. In addition to the information and experience I gained in classes, the most valuable part of the program for me was the networking opportunities. I am looking forward to continuing to grow my career in preventative healthcare and research and I believe the Ergonomics and Biomechanics (ERBI) program at NYU has given me the tools necessary to do that. The program also offers a merit-based partial tuition reimbursement for United States Citizens.
5.0 out of 5.0
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Degree: Health Sciences
Graduation Year: 2019

Application process proves rigorous but indicates the effort required to succeed in the program and indicates the quality of peers and future colleagues you will be exposed to. Courses are an online format with live, interactive lectures which support learning.
4.5 out of 5.0
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Degree: Social Work
Graduation Year: 2019

The graduate program is excellent; dedicated administration, direction, and faculty. Great access to faculty, resources. Amazing library. School is downtown NYC, with all the wonderful resources and arts communities it has to offer. Access to other departments for cross-departmental study and research. Faculty and director eager for and responsive to input. Collaborative; wonderful classmates with attests to NYU's selection.
4.5 out of 5.0
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Degree: Social Work
Graduation Year: 2017

New York University. When people think of NYU they think diversity, opportunity, structure, and mostly expensive. For the past two years I have been enrolled in NYU's social work masters program. For those of you who aren't familiar with NYU, it is broken up into different schools within the school, as are many colleges. So, the school in which my courses are taken is the Silver School of Social Work. Due to the influx of students from all over the northeast students are elgibile to take social work courses at three different campuses. The campuses include the Westchester Campus, Rockland Campus, and the City Campus. This expansion makes the Silver School of Social Work very unique in comparison to other social work programs in NY. Having taken courses at the Westchester Campus I was able to build closer friendships and relationships with the professors. Since the Westchester Campus is smaller then the rest of the campuses, there are fewer professors to choose from. I found this very favorable and accommodating for my needs. Being from a smaller town I liked the idea of familiar faces. At the Westchester campus I had a total of approximately 8 professors for the total 2 year program. For individuals who liked having more of an option of professors they were able to have the option of attending the city campus. One detail about NYU and the Silver School of Social Work that I felt was biased was the political view of the professors in my particular program and the students. Throughout classes, politics was discussed frequently and it was often assumed that the individuals in the classroom all had the same perception. I found this to be unprofessional at times. Overall, I felt that the professors and staff were very accommodating in terms of scheduling, registrations, and assignments. The professors were always easy to reach and responded quickly. If you are looking for a school definitely consider applying to New York University.
4.0 out of 5.0
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Degree: Social Work
Graduation Year: 2018

Pros: NYU Silver school has a great clinical program. Faculty are experts in their field. There are many opportunities to network and gain knowledge in this space. Cons: Affordability for the school. It is not a diverse student group. Some faculty lack the knowledge to facilitate conversations around social justice issues such as race.
4.5 out of 5.0
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Degree: Psychology
Graduation Year: 2017

The Social-Consumer Psychology program at NYU has been uniquely challenging and quite fascinating! The program is designed to prepare students for a career in consumer research, branding, and advertising, as well as provide opportunities for students to move on to PhD programs.
3.0 out of 5.0
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Degree: Psychology
Graduation Year: 2016

I believe the MA program in General Psychology at NYU is better suited to those individuals seeking to pursue social, consumer, and forensic psychology. If your aim is to become a psychologist in the areas of counseling, clinical , or school psychology, I would recommend giving serious thought to the utility of this program in the grand scheme of your career. Many students coming from a non-psychology background or who did not have a great GPA or clinical/research experience enter the program with the intention of boosting their academic, clinical, and research credentials for doctoral study (i.e., they hope to use the degree as a stepping stone for further study). I believe that this can be accomplished in other ways. For those who want to become licensed practitioners, I would recommend foregoing the doctoral route altogether in favor of a Master's in Mental Health Counseling (MHC), Master's in Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) or a Master's in Social Work (MSW). These are degrees that allow one to practice and obtain licensure quickly. Although these programs do not tend to be specialized, one can achieve specialization through continuing education and through supervision at a job. For those who intend to pursue a PhD and become an researcher, this program may be useful. But, again, I would consider alternate avenues. If you come from a psychology background, consider working as a research assistant for 2 years. If you are coming from a non-psychology background, this degree may be helpful to you, but know that the research opportunities in the Graduate School of Arts and Science will mainly be in the areas of social psychology and neuroscience. If you are specifically interested in clinical research you would have to branch out beyond the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Other labs are available through the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, as well as the NYU Child Study Center and the NYU Langone Medical Center. Also, the programs Director emails out a lot of volunteer research assistant opportunities to the MA email group, especially at the beginning of each semester and over the summertime. The NYU name does hold weight when you apply to positions outside of NYU. However, the bottom line is that this is an expensive degree and, ultimately, clinical research opportunities and jobs upon graduation will not be readily available because the program does not have a strong network. When you get an MBA at Stern, you get your moneys worth. In this program, I dont believe that you do. You have to forge opportunities for yourself, but with such a steep price tag, I think that that is wrong. Furthermore, consider that applying to PhD programs in clinical, counseling, and school psychology is competitive. You may have to apply multiple times. If that occurs, know that the job opportunities available to you will be low paying. Without licensure, you will be mainly suited to the work of an RA with a bachelors degree and your compensation will likely be capped in the $50-55k range (and that would be considered good pay with this degree). So, it may be more beneficial to go for a masters degree that will allow you to get licensed while pursuing research on the side. This option would give you insurance when you applyif you dont get in the first time you apply, you wont be stuck working as a glorified administrative assistant, youll be able at least to practice and earn a living. Ultimately, I got what I needed out of this program: a GPA boost, research experience, and acceptance into a PsyD program. But, it was a long haul. When I graduated from the program, the only offer I got was for a research coordinator position that would pay me $32,000. It was sickening to feel so under-valued. I also ended up having to apply two times. The first round, I received acceptances, but no funding. Finally, the second time I applied, I received an offer with funding. I got where I wanted to be, but I think I could have gotten there in a more efficient manner.
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