University of Bridgeport Graduate Program Reviews

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84%
of students recommend
(3.58 out of 5.0)
School rating based on 57 respondents

School Highlights

Most
Affordable
Regionally
Accredited
Non
Profit
High
Grad. Rate
Has Online
Degrees
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School Ratings

Quality of Instruction
Student Financial Services
Satisfaction With Degree
Earning Potential
Prepared for Career

School Information

  • Website: Visit College Website
  • School Accreditation: NEASC CIHE, + 2 more
  • Campus Setting: City: Midsize
  • Student Population: 5,658 (2,941 undergrad)
  • Student to Faculty Ratio: 16 to 1
  • Graduate Attendance Status: 35% part-time, 65% full-time
  • Annual Tuition: $18,320
Source: NCES

Student & Graduate Reviews

2.2 out of 5.0
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Degree: Education Administration
Graduation Year: 2018

This university has many knowledgeable professors. However, very had to receive support from the professors and staff. A large university like this is lacking in a support system. The tutition is high and there has been a huge lack of support. Professors are not available and veryhad to teach. I wish I was able to connect with them and have questions and concerned answered. Very disappointed in there feedback or lack of responding.
4.5 out of 5.0
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Degree: Nutrition
Graduation Year: 2019

UB has an excellent online MS in Human Nutrition program. Professors are all highly qualified, many holding a PhD , MD, and/or ND degree and many having gone through the program themselves. There is a strong focus on the biochemical aspect of human nutrition as well as human disease, functional medicine, assessment and analysis of evidence through an evidence based nutrition course. The online program is moderate to difficult in intensity and requires discipline to keep up with the weekly work load, yet also allows more schedule flexibility than the on campus program. I highly recommend this program to the person interested in furthering their health care career or starting a new one.
1.6 out of 5.0
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Degree: International Business
Graduation Year: 2013

Anonymous said... I almost never express my opinion in public or on the Internet, but when I saw this story about the University of Bridgeport on the web, I felt compelled, as a graduate of the University's MBA program in, to respond to it and to the subsequent comments written about it. But, before I start, I must provide a disclaimer. Although, most see me as an educated person of average or above average intelligence, I am not an exceptionally good writer, and am most certainly capable of making spelling and even more egregious writing errors. I am completely aware that within the realm of debate, on and off the Internet, there exists a well worn debate strategy of attempting to disqualify an opposing person's augment by impeaching the person's speaking or writing ability that has nothing to do with the central point being made. My lack of writing excellence is not, and should not, be viewed as reason to disqualify the validity of my statements and opinions. As an impoverished child growing up on welfare in the inner city of some of the worst slums in America I dreamed. I dreamed of one day of escaping the inner city poverty, condemnation, and crippling low expectations that others of better circumstances of life were forcing on me. What I dared to dream, as a young child, was so much like that of the dreams of millions of other young idealist Americans that passionately believed in what the United States stood for. What I dared to dream was simply the American dream; of success through diligence, determination, integrity, and hard work. Throughout American history, this dream that was responsible, in large measure, for building America, was motivated out of desperation and a passion to succeed. This dream, I believe, is so basic to American existence that it is one of the most cherished and sacredly held values in America. Unfortunately, there are plenty of greedy, unscrupulous opportunistic individuals and organizations that attempt to exploit this sacred American dream by making false promises and selling false hopes, at exorbitantly high prices, to the poorest and most desperate of the American poor. Long before the faculty at the University of Bridgeport went out of strike, there were indications of questionable practices at the university. UB's willingness to exploit the hopes and dreams of young, vulnerable, and innocent people was reminiscent of the worst practices of many "for profit" proprietary schools that exploited the poorest of the poor in their quest for private profits. Back in the early 1980s, the University of Bridgeport engage in a high glitz ad campaign, taking out full page advertisements in the New York Times and other nationally know newspapers, comparing the education received at the University of Bridgeport to the quality of educational available at Ivy League Universities in the United States. It falsely exaggerated the earning power and career success of its graduates. Although, clearly hubris, false and misleading to the more knowledgeable, to the likes of this young person (at the time) and many like me, these very sophisticated and expensive advertisements were stunningly impressive. The photos and physical description of supposedly the school's campus were equally false and misleading at the time. By looking at the photos used in their advertisement, one was left with the impression that the school was located at a beautiful pristine beach front community that was completely surrounded by a lush forested park. Little, if anything, of the school's advertising and recruiting literature was remotely close to reality. While I was a student in the early 1980s at the University of Bridgeport, the incident of crime, including violent crime was intolerably high. I was personally attacked three times on, or near the campus by residents from the low income housing projects that surround the perimeter of the school. During my second year at the school, a man was found shot dead about three blocks from the university campus. It was simply not safe to walk on, or near the campus most of the day. The fear was omnipresent. Adding insult to injury, the career marketability and opportunities claimed to exist for graduates of the school by the university was in, large measure, false. The career planning and placement office at the school was a joke and pitiful. I remember frequently walking into the office and finding no staff at all in the office. After completing my first year at the university, reality about my career prospects began to set in. Things really began to get scary. I remember walking down town Bridgeport and a passerby asking me what university I was attending, and me telling him I was a UB student and his dreadful response. He told me that he had graduated from the University of Bridgeport more than a year earlier and was completely unable to find work. This was unfortunately to be an omen in regards to my own future career prospects as a MBA graduate of good academic standings from the University of Bridgeport. I, like many other graduates of UB have graduated to unemployment and perpetual under employment. I had spent years on my career search after graduating from the University of Bridgeport, sending out many hundreds of resumes to no avail. Only after about twenty years was I able to finally pay off my more than $45,000 student loan used to pay for my education at UB. I feel that, as a young innocent and vulnerable person, my American dream was deliberately violated and exploited for the revenue seeking needs of the University of Bridgeport. The school is nothing more than a highly questionable diploma mill.
1.6 out of 5.0
-
Degree: International Business
Graduation Year: 2013

Anonymous said... I almost never express my opinion in public or on the Internet, but when I saw this story about the University of Bridgeport on the web, I felt compelled, as a graduate of the University's MBA program in, to respond to it and to the subsequent comments written about it. But, before I start, I must provide a disclaimer. Although, most see me as an educated person of average or above average intelligence, I am not an exceptionally good writer, and am most certainly capable of making spelling and even more egregious writing errors. I am completely aware that within the realm of debate, on and off the Internet, there exists a well worn debate strategy of attempting to disqualify an opposing person's augment by impeaching the person's speaking or writing ability that has nothing to do with the central point being made. My lack of writing excellence is not, and should not, be viewed as reason to disqualify the validity of my statements and opinions. As an impoverished child growing up on welfare in the inner city of some of the worst slums in America I dreamed. I dreamed of one day of escaping the inner city poverty, condemnation, and crippling low expectations that others of better circumstances of life were forcing on me. What I dared to dream, as a young child, was so much like that of the dreams of millions of other young idealist Americans that passionately believed in what the United States stood for. What I dared to dream was simply the American dream; of success through diligence, determination, integrity, and hard work. Throughout American history, this dream that was responsible, in large measure, for building America, was motivated out of desperation and a passion to succeed. This dream, I believe, is so basic to American existence that it is one of the most cherished and sacredly held values in America. Unfortunately, there are plenty of greedy, unscrupulous opportunistic individuals and organizations that attempt to exploit this sacred American dream by making false promises and selling false hopes, at exorbitantly high prices, to the poorest and most desperate of the American poor. Long before the faculty at the University of Bridgeport went out of strike, there were indications of questionable practices at the university. UB's willingness to exploit the hopes and dreams of young, vulnerable, and innocent people was reminiscent of the worst practices of many "for profit" proprietary schools that exploited the poorest of the poor in their quest for private profits. Back in the early 1980s, the University of Bridgeport engage in a high glitz ad campaign, taking out full page advertisements in the New York Times and other nationally know newspapers, comparing the education received at the University of Bridgeport to the quality of educational available at Ivy League Universities in the United States. It falsely exaggerated the earning power and career success of its graduates. Although, clearly hubris, false and misleading to the more knowledgeable, to the likes of this young person (at the time) and many like me, these very sophisticated and expensive advertisements were stunningly impressive. The photos and physical description of supposedly the school's campus were equally false and misleading at the time. By looking at the photos used in their advertisement, one was left with the impression that the school was located at a beautiful pristine beach front community that was completely surrounded by a lush forested park. Little, if anything, of the school's advertising and recruiting literature was remotely close to reality. While I was a student in the early 1980s at the University of Bridgeport, the incident of crime, including violent crime was intolerably high. I was personally attacked three times on, or near the campus by residents from the low income housing projects that surround the perimeter of the school. During my second year at the school, a man was found shot dead about three blocks from the university campus. It was simply not safe to walk on, or near the campus most of the day. The fear was omnipresent. Adding insult to injury, the career marketability and opportunities claimed to exist for graduates of the school by the university was in, large measure, false. The career planning and placement office at the school was a joke and pitiful. I remember frequently walking into the office and finding no staff at all in the office. After completing my first year at the university, reality about my career prospects began to set in. Things really began to get scary. I remember walking down town Bridgeport and a passerby asking me what university I was attending, and me telling him I was a UB student and his dreadful response. He told me that he had graduated from the University of Bridgeport more than a year earlier and was completely unable to find work. This was unfortunately to be an omen in regards to my own future career prospects as a MBA graduate of good academic standings from the University of Bridgeport. I, like many other graduates of UB have graduated to unemployment and perpetual under employment. I had spent years on my career search after graduating from the University of Bridgeport, sending out many hundreds of resumes to no avail. Only after about twenty years was I able to finally pay off my more than $45,000 student loan used to pay for my education at UB. I feel that, as a young innocent and vulnerable person, my American dream was deliberately violated and exploited for the revenue seeking needs of the University of Bridgeport. The school is nothing more than a highly questionable diploma mill.
3.8 out of 5.0
-
Degree: Mechanical Engineering
Graduation Year: 2018

It's a very small but tight knit Private institution. The ratio of student to teachers is 15:1. If the student is happy with such a small number of class ratio then it is good option to come to University of fBridgeport. There is a large number if diversity visible in the campus as students from 80 countries come to study. Professors are highly educated and affiliated to NASA, Sikorsky and many top institution, which can help a student in their project and master thesis. Overall the college has a very good review and located in a beautiful seaside location.
3.4 out of 5.0
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Degree: Accounting
Graduation Year: 2009

The school gave me the opportunity to get to know great teachers that were always involved in your development.
2.6 out of 5.0
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Degree: Computer Science
Graduation Year: 2010

Its good but for international students its tough to deal with staff , especially dealing with accounting people
5.0 out of 5.0
-
Degree: Elementary Education
Graduation Year: 2018

The Elementary Education Program at UB is an accelerated program. There are many professors that are extremely interested in you getting good grades and progressing into the workforce. The internship program at UB was exactly what I needed. The program took one school year to complete.
5.0 out of 5.0
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Degree: Political Science
Graduation Year: 2018

I love the program that I am currently in. The professors are amazing and are always willing to help you out. I picked this program because I wanted to be able to have the flexibility to work and pursue my education. Since I didn't have the luxury of only attending school. I have learned a lot, and I believe that I will be prepared to pursue my career with the knowledge I have gained at this institution. Plus they're so encouraging!
3.4 out of 5.0
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Degree: MBA in Marketing
Graduation Year: 2019

UB is a great school, that accommodates a lot of students from all over. The learning environment is great and the lecturers are very knowledgeable. You are being prepared for any work environment relating to your field from day one with careful and painstaking attention to how you develop your resume, a guide on your chosen career path and so on.
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