Brown University Graduate Program Reviews

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96%
of students recommend
(4.34 out of 5.0)
School rating based on 154 respondents

School Highlights

Most
Affordable
Regionally
Accredited
Non
Profit
High
Grad. Rate
Has Online
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School Ratings

Quality of Instruction
Student Financial Services
Satisfaction With Degree
Earning Potential
Prepared for Career

School Information

  • Website: Visit College Website
  • School Accreditation: NEASC CIHE
  • Programmatic Accreditation: ABET, + 3 more
  • Campus Setting: City: Midsize
  • Student Population: 9,458 (6,652 undergrad)
  • Student to Faculty Ratio: 9 to 1
  • Graduate Attendance Status: 8% part-time, 92% full-time
  • Annual Tuition: $49,146
Source: NCES

Student & Graduate Reviews

5.0 out of 5.0
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Degree: MBA
Graduation Year: 2013

Brown is an amazing school. It has a balance of optimum amount of pressure,fun and competition to keep you going. No matter what field or program are you in, it will pay you well in life.
4.8 out of 5.0
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Degree: Health Sciences
Graduation Year: 2011

Go to an Ivy League and be challenged. The learning environment is a lot better than state schools. Embrace your youth and do lots of activities in college.
5.0 out of 5.0
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Degree: Biomedical Sciences
Graduation Year: 2009

Pleasant and very comfortable when it comes to learning
4.75 out of 5.0
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Degree: Biology
Graduation Year: 2017

Although it is an Ivy League university, Brown does not sit at the forefront of people's minds when thinking of an Ivy League school, unlike Harvard, Princeton, or Yale. But while Brown may lack the public spotlight relative to other big-name schools, it nevertheless lives up to the Ivy reputation as an integrative, academically rigorous university. From a cultural standpoint, Brown cultivates an open, communal environment where people of all nationalities, religions, genders, and sexual orientations are welcome. The student body and faculty are all quite politically active, and it is not uncommon to see students (especially undergraduates) form public demonstrations on a variety of social subjects. Often big names come to campus to talk about political issues, give lecture-seminars, or have a panel discussion. Just this year, for example, we had The Daily Show's Trevor Noah, former British prime minister David Cameron, Robert DeNiro, Daveed Diggs from the musical sensation "Hamilton", and several Nobel Laureates visit campus for public forums and lectures given to, particularly, students. Beyond political activism and visitors, Brown's culture of openness plays a major role in education. Brown is known for its unique educational platform in which students are free to build their own degrees with the courses they feel fit best with their interests. Consequently, outside of a few standard courses that must be taken for a given concentration, students are free to build their education as he/she finds fit, and professors organize original seminars and courses almost every semester on specific topics of interest to them and their students. As an ecology and evolutionary biology graduate student, I was able to take a seminar on global climate through geologic history, a seminar where we use physiological principles to reconstruct an extinct animal, and courses on animal locomotion, biological materials, and biomechanics. Of course, some graduate programs at Brown have specific courses that must be taken in order to graduate, which I believe is the case for students in public health, the physical sciences, and some of the Humanities; most departmental websites explicitly state whether this is the case or not. And whether you select your adviser before or after coming to Brown also varies according to department. In my department, the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, students coordinate with a professor they are interested in working with before applying to Brown; should he/she be accepted, that person then becomes their primary adviser. This is not the case for someone going into the Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, and Biochemistry department, though, where they instead have students rotate around labs for the first year or so before selecting a primary adviser. Again, most departmental website explicitly state those details. Outside of your department, though, lies a network of people and opportunities for you to grow as a budding academic or public service member. Brown has the CareerLab, an entire building dedicated to helping students grow as professionals, whether that is by helping them construct their resumes/CVs, doing mock interviews, giving critical feedback on written proposals, advice on steps to reach your desired goals, or taking professional photos for your LinkedIn account. For those who are striving to become academics, there is the Sheridan Center, which organizes several certificate programs to learn about teaching pedagogy, how to develop a syllabus, how to write a teaching philosophy statement, and how to give critical feedback to students and other professionals. For networking, Brown hosts an annual GradFair in the fall, where representatives of big companies or professional fields (many of them Brown alumni) come and run panel discussions, one-on-one interviews, resume critiques, and information stands. It's a great networking opportunity and often opens the door to new possibilities and/or your ultimate goals. Overall, Brown is an incredible place with a lot of great opportunities if you take advantage of them, but it also costs an incredible amount. In my department, doctoral students specifically are given an annual stipend that covers their tuition, health insurance premium, and living support. They also have an incentive program where students entering with their own funding will have a percentage matched by his/her department. That seems to be true of the sciences in general, a reflection of the high priority put on science, which tends to get majority of the funding, whereas the Arts and Humanities get a bit of the short end of the stick; students in those departments frequently must TA majority of the way through their graduate school career. In my department, students are required to TA for at least a year, after which they are free to focus solely on whatever seminars/courses they want and of course their research. This blatant dichotomy between the sciences and humanities was addressed this past year as students fought to be classified as employees and therefore have union rights. The full effect has not taken place yet, but if you are in the Arts or Humanities, it is something worth asking further about. Activism on the part of graduate students was also what granted all graduate students dental insurance on top of health insurance; it really does play a major part in the university's culture. Ultimately, Brown is a phenomenal school for graduate school life. The University cares about your opinion, is constantly finding ways to help you achieve the goals you are after, and builds an environment that feels like an enormous family. As an Ivy League school, you have access to copious literature, academic resources, technology, and facilities. To get around, most students live within walking distance from campus or ride their bikes in, although Providence is honestly not built well for biking. But if you're on campus late and don't want to brave walking home alone, an on-call shuttle bus runs around campus through the wee hours of the night and can pick you up wherever (plus your school ID gets you on any of the public bus transportation for free!). Truly, this is an incredible school with plentiful opportunities and a host of people willing to help you along the way. I have never regretted coming here for my education.
4.0 out of 5.0
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Degree: Biomedical Sciences
Graduation Year: 2016

Brown University: Master of Science in Biotechnology (Grad, 2016): The Masters degree was part of Brown's 5th-Year Masters program. I had previously completed a Bachelor of Arts in 2015, with a double-major in Biology and Theater Arts. The program is great in terms of learning potential and diversity of courses offered. It lacks in cohesiveness when it comes to networking opportunities, and is especially lacking in terms of the needs of international students. The co-op route towards a career in the healthcare industry is common, but Brown is not able to use its considerable influence to attract the most up and coming healthcare entities. The focus is very much on University-based research and healthcare consulting. Laboratory experience is exclusive, depends on the lab that you are working with, and there is very little collaboration between departments. Research infrastructure at Brown is robust, specifically towards medical technologies, though there are few labs that work on medical devices to the full potential. My work on echolocation/bioacoustics in bats at the Simmons Lab (Department of Neuroscience) has been very informative and rewarding. I am concurrently working with the Borton Lab to design and develop an implantable medical device in the pain management space. Intellectual Property (IP) and commercialization through Brown's Technology Ventures Office (TVO) is very much as you might expect they look for any way to gain ownership and IP rights over your original designs. Collaborations with Rhode Island Hospital and surrounding biotech companies is valuable, but career opportunities through these sources are limited. The labs at Brown are equipped with the best technologies to execute your ideas, it is just a matter of gaining that access and protecting your work.
5.0 out of 5.0
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Degree: Veterinary Science
Graduation Year: 2019

Brown University, specifically the Patho-biology graduate program, is a fantastic place to receive a quality graduate school education while also enjoying the process. We are blessed with some of the worlds most brilliant research talent as instructors, who passionately strive to instill the highest quality of education in the next generation of scientists. The school as a whole is incredibly flexible to meet individual students needs as opposed to generalizing strict requirements to make their jobs easier. I have heard several stories from students as to how Brown was able to work with them to maintain the same quality education while providing the necessary tools for said student to get through their individual hardships. Brown is also flexible in less severe instances, for example, students from various programs can work in labs not affiliated with their specific program based on their specific research desires. Its this flexibility that makes me realize that I am an important part of this program and my individual development as a researcher is important to my program and the school as a whole. I also appreciate the value placed on making graduate school a work hard, play hard environment. In my program specifically we have a very energetic, enthusiastic administrative staff who work very hard to maintain programs specifically designed to bring together students and faculty in a non-scientific environment. Being friends with my colleagues makes me feel more included and appreciated in this environment which I enjoy working and being a part of. I am very happy with my decision to join the Pathobiology program here at Brown for my graduate school studies.
3.75 out of 5.0
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Degree: Public Policy
Graduation Year: 2016

Although the program is relatively new, there is a lot of support from administration at Brown for public policy. The program directors have been responsive to student feedback and the needs of their students. The small class sizes are also wonderful!
3.17 out of 5.0
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Degree: Public Administration
Graduation Year: 2016

Overall Brown University provides a holistic experience in terms of academics and social life. The university should focus more on providing greater financial to incoming graduate students.
4.0 out of 5.0
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Degree: Biomedical Engineering
Graduation Year: 2017

It's a great network of students and faculty. A very collaborative environment, not cut throat like the other Ivy's. Depending on personal work ethic it can be overwhelming.
3.5 out of 5.0
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Degree: Biomedical Engineering
Graduation Year: 2016

I absolutely love the biomedical Engineering Master's program at Brown. The faculty is extremely supportive and are always accessible when you need to talk with them. The professors care about the student's educational and self growth, which is really important. The program really focus's on research and for me specifically, it has been the most rewarding. I worked in industry for a few years and was nervous of the thought of going back to school after so long and forgetting what I learned as an undergrad. But the professors, graduate students, and staff all work together to make sure you feel comfortable and provide extra help if you need it. Only con is that I wish they provided more courses - as the program has limited courses for graduate students.
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