University of California - Berkeley Graduate Program Reviews

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92%
of students recommend
(4.14 out of 5.0)
School rating based on 224 respondents

School Highlights

Most
Affordable
Regionally
Accredited
Non
Profit
High
Grad. Rate
Has Online
Degrees
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School Ratings

Quality of Instruction
Student Financial Services
Satisfaction With Degree
Earning Potential
Prepared for Career

School Information

  • Website: Visit College Website
  • School Accreditation: WASC WSCUC and ACEND
  • Campus Setting: City: Midsize
  • Student Population: 40,154 (29,310 undergrad)
  • Student to Faculty Ratio: 18 to 1
  • Graduate Attendance Status: 15% part-time, 85% full-time
  • Annual Tuition: $14,170 in-state; $29,272 out-of-state
Source: NCES

Student & Graduate Reviews

4.25 out of 5.0
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Degree: Liberal Studies
Graduation Year: 1995

The University of California at Berkeley is the premier public institution in the world and I am proud to have graduated from it. A myriad of academic, extracurricular, and socialization opportunities were availed me as an undergraduate there in the early 1990s. At the time, the pro-black movement and other POC groups were pushing back against the anti-affirmative action backers, who represented a misguided sense of colorblindness. Los Angeles burned again under race-related riots (due to the race-related beating of motorist Rodney King), as other urban centers were neglected by the typically callous economic cutbacks and outsourcing of jobs under centrist President Clinton and the Republican-led congress. And crack continued to devastate Americas inner cities abetted by the politicians. And yet, some politically influential mouthpieces tried to tell us undergrads of color that the effects of the Civil Rights Movement, then 30 years past, had leveled the socioeconomic and racial playing field. Well, as of today, we know that to simply be preposterous as campaigns demanding fairness in wages and education for women and POCs are ratcheting up the awareness of Americas still-intransigent, institutionalized disparities and iniquities. UC Berkeley was hallowed ground for the Free Speech Movement, ethnic and womens studies opportunities, and pro-black sensibilities. The campus was and is a cauldron of liberal thought and pioneering outlooks. Change doesn't come easily; it takes demands and demonstrations; and the Berkeley campus history bears that out. The campus and its storied importance and position in world academia is even more important than ever in light of the obvious proliferation of hate groups and racist politics of late. White supremacists have occupied the White House and other political halls and have swelled the alt-rights ranks. Now that such American ugliness is out and in the open, there's no better time to join the Resistance and its admixture of youth and experience students and professors and their campaign against hate, racism, sexism, xenophobia, and homophobia, and other means of social and institutional oppression. Berkeley has been ground zero for so many important sociopolitical movements in the past. I am proud that my alma mater has such a distinguished and disruptive history and I hope to begin my graduate work there, so many years later, to resume my part in that ongoing fervor for liberty, justice, and peace.
3.6 out of 5.0
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Degree: MSW
Graduation Year: 2019

The MSW program at Berkeley focuses on practice over classroom learning. For this reason I would recommend having some experience in the field prior to applying, or it will feel very theoretical and more difficult for you. Half of your work here will be in a real organization, applying the theories and practice models that you are learning in class to your current work. It is a great learning environment, and will definitely challenge you. Being able to think critically about all levels of social work is a skill that you will develop here, where most other school focus on the micro level. Having s strong focus on policy is one of the huge benefits of this school. Even if you are going to do direct practice after graduation, you should have a solid understanding of how policy in your organization affects your work and how those policies are informed by bigger policies and movements. Because of this policy focus, you will start to see better some of the inequities and injustices perpetuated by the school itself. This school is special, but it looks like every other flawed system in this country because it is - they make a lot of mistakes. But you will also have space to help the school see those mistakes and hopefully correct some of them. Every year things get a tiny bit better for the next class of students because of the work of current students. Building community here with other students, organizing, and affecting change at the school, in your placement organizations, community, etc. are the most powerful outcomes you can get from Berkeley. If you are going to come here, come here ready to do real work and have difficult conversations. The degree is super expensive here so if all you want is the paper, then don't come here because it won't be worth it just for that. But you will have a great network here, and you will learn, and you will be better prepared to affect change when you leave.
3.75 out of 5.0
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Degree: Journalism
Graduation Year: 2019

I am currently enrolled as a graduate student at UC Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism, and I am a first-year. Given that it is a two-year program, I am only able to speak on the experiences of first semester. I would like to begin with a note on faculty and staff. The school is relatively small, but it is staffed with a sufficient amount of employees who dedicate their time (and careers) to making the lives of their students easier. We have unobstructed access to financial advisers, career advisers, and academic advisers, all of whom vow to be there for us when needed. Also worthy of mention is the fact that the dean himself has a relatively open-door policy, meaning he makes it easy for students to have important conversations with him. Furthermore, there are two additional associate deans who also double as full-time faculty/lecturers at the school. They are also available for both quick advice and important counseling, as well as for random conversations in between. In terms of professors, I really appreciate that most of them are alums from the J-school who are able to understand exactly where students are coming from. They are also all experienced in the field with impressive resumes; this gives students access to a network of professional journalists who play a hand in not only teaching us during our time as graduate students, but possibly also in connecting us to the right people once our careers begin post-graduation. Lastly, as journalism is an industry heavily focused on gear and equipment, it is important that we receive proper technical training on how to handle expensive cameras and video cameras. Students have been trained by the school's own equipment manager on several different occasions. There is also a really neat and organized rental schedule that is well-maintained and constantly updated; this makes for an easy check-out/check-in process when students rent equipment for assignments. We have also been spoken to about the importance of insurance, and we have been recommended different insurance plans. The classroom experience at UC Berkeley's J-school is intimate, as there are only about a dozen students assigned to a single professor in most sections. This makes learning an extremely personalized process, which I believe helps benefit the student immensely. All students are on different tracks and career paths--from New Media to Video Journalism to Narrative Writing--so it helps to have plenty of one-on-one time with professors who are guiding us along. The selection of classes is also very broad--ranging from practical, niche reporting courses (such as sports reporting, investigative reporting, business reporting, and international reporting), to more specialized courses on reporting on sexual violence, reporting from war abroad, etc. Students are encouraged to dabble in different areas of reporting to develop a versatile skillset. For example, though I am following the Narrative Writing and New Media tracks, I am currently enrolled in a mandatory Intro to Visual Storytelling course. The course, along with Intro to Reporting, is required regardless of which track you are on because the school wants all students to try both video and narrative mediums for reporting at least once so to at least establish a basic foundation. Perhaps my favorite part about attending Berkeley's J-school is the network of amazing peers and faculty/staff that I have been introduced to, as well as the honor of being apart of this network that has many useful connections in the industry. I am constantly interacting with my peers at the many events the school hosts, which features panel discussions on important themes in the industry and talks led by leading journalists (some of whom are former students) who have succeeded professionally. I am also involved in clubs at the school including the Asian American Journalists Association, which meets frequently to plan school events, offer constructive feedback on our projects, and spend time/bond outside of the classroom environment. At the J-school, we are constantly reminded to de-stress and maintain a positive mindset and a healthy well-being, so making time for relaxation and fun is absolutely mandatory! I recommend, without hesitation, the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism for any reporter who is serious about perfecting his or her craft or interested in developing new skillsets. Journalism is a constantly-evolving field, and Berkeley's J-school is ready to help students modernize and prepare for the current shift as well as any future change to come.
4.4 out of 5.0
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Degree: Public Health
Graduation Year: 2006

College is a place where you learn and find yourself. The first time away from home, I was able to find myself and slowly define my own path and choose what I wanted to do. College is a very diverse place with many students from different backgrounds. My world broadened with the meeting of these people who I am still lucky to call friends as I was able to learn about various cultures.
4.4 out of 5.0
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Degree: Information Technology
Graduation Year: 2006

It was the best time of my life! University of California is the best
3.8 out of 5.0
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Degree: Engineering
Graduation Year: 2015

It is a great, well-rounded school. From the liberal arts to engineering, it has something for everyone. In addition to being great academically, it has a great campus culture that encourages people to be socially aware and to be involved in your community. I've learned so much from the people I met there.
4.8 out of 5.0
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Degree: Information Technology
Graduation Year: 2014

It was an extension so my classes with at a remote class on with online classes. What we studied were exactly projects I was currently working on in my office. My Work, Degree, and the training I received made it possible for me to be promoted to Director of I.T. It was a great experience and I would recommend it highly.
2.8 out of 5.0
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Degree: Public Health
Graduation Year: 2008

It is a great institution to study public health as you have lecturers some of whom are physicians and/or work with international health organizations such as WHO.
3.8 out of 5.0
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Degree: Engineering
Graduation Year: 2012

I will always value my time at Cal. Not only for the things I learned, but also for the wonderful atmosphere on campus and around the area.
4.6 out of 5.0
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Degree: Computer Science
Graduation Year: 2006

Nice place to study and meet many types of people. I enjoyed my time.
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